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"This thing's begging to be on the radio. Smart and hard, soft and hearty, its full of water and fire". Those are the words of Music reporter C.A. MacConnell when she described Pete Dressman ...and the Soul Unified Nation's new album "The Current" in a March issue of City Beat. And that is exactly what to expect when you listen to "The Current" or when you see Pete and the S.U.N. live. Head banging, rolling on the ground, jumping all over the stage are common at their shows. But then the sound softens, and it is as if you have just ran into a sunny clearing after being on a mischievous trail through a jungle. Pete Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation want to take you on a ride that invites EVERYONE. And they hope people want to ride again. "There seems to be something in our band for everyone". Dressman says. "It is very apparent at our shows the diversity of people that like our stuff". Pete Dressman and the S.U.N. have toured with G. Love and Special Sauce and have opened for Big Head Todd and the Monsters, Tyrone Wells, and Jon McLaughlin. Dressman has also opened for Taylor Hicks and the Wood Brothers. Pete Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation have recently released their new album titled "The Current" on Feb. 2nd at The Madison Theater, where over 600 people were in attendance. Also their album was named to the Digstation.com's Best Sellers List for over three weeks. Songs from "The Current" have been played on radio stations all over the Cincinnati area and is regularly played on WNKU 89.7. The trio from the Cincinnati area has even started getting plays off their new CD in France! Why Go. Mention those words and I'm thrown back into the pits of the '90s, when Grunge devoured the music world. A true Alternative hurricane. Although I followed Pearl Jam cross-country, the closest I came to meeting the band was this scene: landing flat on my back on top of Vedder's boot. Ouch. Singer/songwriter Pete Dressman has better Vedder stories than I do. Never thought I'd meet a PJ fan as bad as me, but I've met my match. He met Vedder at a Cubs/Reds game and he talked to him on the phone once. I surrender. I've never been to Mac's Pizza, even though they stole part of my last name. Meeting Dressman is my first adventure there. Mac's is shadowy and spooky, with dark wood chairs and low lighting, but I can still see that Dressman is tired. Wearing a red bandanna to hold down his wild, curlyhair, he wears a tan corduroy jacket. Grinning, he describes the gig the night before as "something outta Wayne's World." Although he's visibly hurting from a hard night, Dressman's deep brown eyes hold a mischievous light, a spark that lurks beneath his dark looks. Dressman says, "We were growing up during the whole Grunge explosion." He studied Singles, Ten and Nevermind religiously, and his study of Grunge shows in the classic Alternative feel of his music, but not without his individuality bursting through. "I dropped outta college (in 2005) and said, 'Let's do music,' " he says. "That's the only thing I think I understand -- songs -- structures of songs. For the most part, I can just feel where the song's gonna go. It's always been like that." Soon Dressman added Daryl Demoss (drums) and Marc Brodie (bass). The idea for the band name, the Soul Unified Nation, came to him in a dream. Dressman was voted the favorite solo artist in a national competition by a Fox Network-owned TV station, and he has opened for Taylor Hicks, G. Love & the Special Sauce, Tyrone Wells and more. Of his new CD, The Current, Dressman says it has an "Alternative Blues feel to it. It's got its Rock. It's got its slow songs. It has its political songs, and it has its upbeat love and dirty Blues. It kinda sucks everybody in together." Dressman's star-quality voice shines on the title track, which begins with lone vocals, rolling into an open ocean sound. His voice holds deep drawls, an echo and a depth, combined with integrity, soul and a natural, catchy feel. Harder songs burn with guitars and drums and the vocals are tempting and rocking. Let me be blunt: This thing's begging to be on the radio. Smart and hard, soft and hearty, it's full of water and fire. Then, over pizza, we start in on more old Pearl Jam war stories, as if we're chillin' on Stone Gossard's front porch or diggin' up Mike McCready's garden.

2013

Nominated:

Singer/Songwriter

2014

Pete wrote the song "SHARE THE WORLD" to celebrate Magic Nutrition products that's become the company's theme song




Once. Black. Jeremy. Why Go. Mention those words and I'm thrown back into the pits of the '90s, when Grunge devoured the music world. A true Alternative hurricane. Although I followed Pearl Jam cross-country, the closest I came to meeting the band was this scene: landing flat on my back on top of Vedder's boot. Ouch. Singer/songwriter Pete Dressman has better Vedder stories than I do. Never thought I'd meet a PJ fan as bad as me, but I've met my match. He met Vedder at a Cubs/Reds game and he talked to him on the phone once. I surrender. I've never been to Mac's Pizza, even though they stole part of my last name. Meeting Dressman is my first adventure there. Mac's is shadowy and spooky, with dark wood chairs and low lighting, but I can still see that Dressman is tired. Wearing a red bandanna to hold down his wild, curlyhair, he wears a tan corduroy jacket. Grinning, he describes the gig the night before as "something outta Wayne's World." Although he's visibly hurting from a hard night, Dressman's deep brown eyes hold a mischievous light, a spark that lurks beneath his dark looks. Dressman says, "We were growing up during the whole Grunge explosion." He studied Singles, Ten and Nevermind religiously, and his study of Grunge shows in the classic Alternative feel of his music, but not without his individuality bursting through. "I dropped outta college (in 2005) and said, 'Let's do music,' " he says. "That's the only thing I think I understand -- songs -- structures of songs. For the most part, I can just feel where the song's gonna go. It's always been like that." Soon Dressman added Daryl Demoss (drums) and Marc Brodie (bass). The idea for the band name, the Soul Unified Nation, came to him in a dream. Dressman was voted the favorite solo artist in a national competition by a Fox Network-owned TV station, and he has opened for Taylor Hicks, G. Love & the Special Sauce, Tyrone Wells and more. Of his new CD, The Current, Dressman says it has an "Alternative Blues feel to it. It's got its Rock. It's got its slow songs. It has its political songs, and it has its upbeat love and dirty Blues. It kinda sucks everybody in together." Dressman's star-quality voice shines on the title track, which begins with lone vocals, rolling into an open ocean sound. His voice holds deep drawls, an echo and a depth, combined with integrity, soul and a natural, catchy feel. Harder songs burn with guitars and drums and the vocals are tempting and rocking. Let me be blunt: This thing's begging to be on the radio. Smart and hard, soft and hearty, it's full of water and fire. Then, over pizza, we start in on more old Pearl Jam war stories, as if we're chillin' on Stone Gossard's front porch or diggin' up Mike McCready's garden.

 Pete Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation (also known as the S.U.N.) formed with its current members in 2006. Former Fickle drummer Daryl DeMoss and former Stonewater bassist Marcus Brodie provide the low-end while Pete's guitar, harmonica and heavily soulful voice define their 'in-your-face blues' style. Since their inception they have performed in music venues throughout the south and Midwest United States. They have acquired a strong fan base through their high-energy rock and groove filled live shows. The band is consistently offered opportunities to perform at various venues and clubs, especially in the Greater Cincinnati area due to their large crowd draw. Along with live performance exposure, Pete Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation have been featured on radio stations in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. In 2006 Pete Dressman was voted Favorite Solo Artist on Fox Network's MyNetworkTV national online competition. The competition lasted three months requiring people across the nation to vote for their favorite musicians. Pete became a semi-finalist after receiving over 8,000 votes and went on to the finals to win in the solo genre. His music will be featured on two of the MyNetworkTV national television shows. Pete Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation have opened up for national touring acts such as Taylor Hicks (American Idol winner), G. Love and Special Sauce, Fiction Plane, Big Head Todd and the Monsters, Jon McLaughlin, Tyrone Wells, Marty Casey and Lovehammer (Rock Star INXS runner up) and top 40 chart topper, country musician Jake Owen. Pete's music was featured by Northern Kentucky University's Radio, Television and Film Department for a student music video project. The S.U.N. has also appeared on local radio shows, talk shows, cooking shows as well as participated in Cincinnati's Tall Stacks Music Festival where they were invited back for two additional shows throughout the weekend. To truly appreciate this trio you need to bear witness to their exciting show.
One spin through Pete Dressman's new album, Vol. II, might give the impression that the Cincinnati singer/songwriter and his band, the Soul Unified Nation, are unrepentant lovers of contemporary classic Rock icons like Pearl Jam who wouldn't be the least bit out of place opening for locally-based Psych Rock trio Buffalo Killers. And you'd be right. A spin through Dressman's debut album, 2008's The Current, might give the impression that he has an abiding respect for '70s Folk troubadours and feels completely at ease alone on stage with his acoustic guitar and a head full of heartfelt songs. And you'd be right. Dressman isn't necessarily trying to be all things to all people. It just happens that way. "I like classic music, that's definitely an influence," the Cincinnati-based singer/songwriter says over lunch at the Hyde Park Cock and Bull pub. "I even wanted (Vol. II) to sound more classic than it does, but I think it came out great." Even before the release of The Current just more than four years ago, Dressman was difficult to succinctly categorize. In the intervening span of time, he embraced a fuller electric Rock sound, but since finishing Vol. II with the S.U.N. as a quartet, the lineup has again shifted to a trio (with bassist Eric Keyes and drummer Kevin Finkelmeier) and Dressman has dialed the volume down in favor of a folkier, more subdued yet still powerful live presentation. "We play out mostly acoustically, so it felt natural to go back to a more stripped-down, laidback kind of style," Dressman says. "Our first album was more like that. This new album has been sitting on the shelf for two years. All these songs are pretty old, for us." Monetary concerns and scheduling conflicts made it necessary for Dressman and the S.U.N. to record Vol. II in piecemeal fashion, adding a considerable amount of downtime to the process. As much time and energy as Dressman has expended on Vol. II, he's not the least bit nitpicky about its release. There was no temptation on his part to go in and endlessly tweak the album between sessions. "I was over it a long time ago," Dressman says with a laugh. "I was like, 'Let's get this fucker out.' These songs should have been recorded four years ago. I'm just happy to get it out, get it off my chest and move on to the next thing, which is already turning into something pretty cool." Not surprisingly, in the waiting period to get Vol. II ready for release, Dressman has been writing new material that is hewing closer to the acoustic direction of The Current. In fact, Dressman's new songs are tapping into some of his earliest influences and inspirations. "We're just getting back to what it originally was," Dressman says. "We were a bluesier band; this is more of a Rock album that's a lot darker than our first album. The first album is more of a fun CD. But there are a lot of good songs on this CD and I still love to play them out." The problem with playing the Vol. II songs out at this point is that Dressman (with and without the S.U.N.) has regular, repeating bookings during the week in venues that aren't necessarily conducive to the volume and chaos of an electric Rock band. "Those songs get neglected by not playing them out as much," Dressman says. "And the electric songs don't sound right acoustically. If I'm going to play a Rock song, I want to rock it out." Dressman and the Soul Unified Nation will indeed rock out and turn up for this week's show celebrating the release of Vol. II. The band will perform mostly electric, but with some acoustic moments as well as a few of the new songs that have not yet been shaped in the studio. "The show's going to be electric and we'll fill it in with some acoustic songs," Dressman says. "It's going to be the best of both worlds, I guess. It'll be half and half, and maybe some new ones that will be on the next one." From his teenage Punk beginnings in Fort Mitchell, Ky., and high school songwriting experience to his years balancing gigs with college and living out of his car, Dressman has been ruled by a duality of muses. There's the Pearl Jam/Raconteurs/Black Keys/Wolfmother vibe that informed Vol. II, in addition to the acoustic Folk/Blues/Soul influences that have run through everything he's done, electric or otherwise. But as far as inspirations for the subjects of his songs, Dressman finds the spark of songwriting within and beyond himself. "It seems like there's a lot of frustration in some of the songs, some relationship stuff, a couple of political songs, letters to our oh-so-great government telling them to realize why they're there," Dressman says. "A lot of the songs I don't even remember writing the words, and they kind of change meaning as time goes on. Some of the songs, I didn't even know what they were about. They just came out, and I make up new meanings for them every time I listen to them." ©





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